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Home / Economic Recovery Task Force

MAYOR’S TASK FORCE ON ECONOMIC RECOVERY

Mayor's Task Force on Economic Recovery - Cover Page to Report
Mayor’s Task Force on Economic Recovery – Click to download the report

The Mayor’s Task Force on Economic Recovery provided multi-sectoral leadership and direction to guide Hamilton’s economic recovery in the immediate aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic.  It has formulated an aggressive, action driven plan to position the City of Hamilton now, for long-term, sustainable and equitable economic recovery.

The Task Force will:

  • Develop an action driven plan to position the City of Hamilton now, for long-term, sustainable and equitable economic recovery.
  • Establish defined outcomes with specific deliverables to address the priority economic impacts of the pandemic confronting Hamilton based industry/businesses, employers and employees.
  • Identify issues and opportunities to convey to other levels of government.
  • Provide advice and assistance in the implementation of the Task Force’s plan for economic recovery.
  • Provide advice and suggestions to the Mayor, Council and senior staff for specific City of Hamilton actions and responses.

The Task Force has concluded their roundtables and working groups and have released the Report on the Mayor’s Task Force on Economic Recovery. Below is a short dashboard of the recommended actions and their status to date. This dashboard will be updated as new information and new status updates are reported.

To skip down to the additional Council Priority Tables including recommendations and actions around: (click on the link in the list below)


Recommended Actions and current status

Note: There are 103 Recommended Actions. You are welcome to use the top search box to search by topic within the table.

ActionRecommendationCommentsStatus
1Establishment of a Small Business Tax Class Status as permitted by the Province of Ontario that will target support for small businesses in the City of HamiltonApproved December 9, 2020 GIC motion for Finance Department to explore and will be bringing this item to Council in 2021.complete
2Create ‘Hardship Grant/ Micro Business Relief Fund’Referred to Hamilton Business Centre
3Utilize, promote and expand to NFPs or social enterprises granting program through Hamilton Business Centre.Referred to Hamilton Business Centre
4Waive fees for new businesses being set up; review all fines, fees, interest and penalties; cap business license fees for five years; work with businesses on solutions not just a hard 'no'; lower or eliminate fees for patios (cost isn't worth the return as it is)Approved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - all General Business License Fees, Trade License Fees, Taxi and Personal Transportation Providers (PTP) Fees, and Film Permit Fees be frozen at 2020 levels for 2021.complete
5Industry comparisons of business closures, vacancies, agency and agency program closures city wide to track vulnerable areas/neighbourhoods to focus supportReferred to Economic Development staff
6Undertake collective purchasing of technology to reduce costs that would otherwise be higher for individuals or organizations.Referred to Hamilton Public Library for related services
7Provide more public space wifi (libraries, Career Centres).Discussion of WIFI in public spaces/areas underway (Chief Digital Officer). Following approved motion, staff be reporting back in Q2 2021. complete
8Build on existing community supports. Hamilton Business Centre's Digital Mainstreet initiative; Green Venture/Green Byte refurbishment of computers for community needs; tech savvy organizations teach and support others who are learning (such as about ecommerce).Underway by Hamilton Business Centre. Additional funding confirmed for Digital Mainstreet.complete
9Build on the City's Intelligent Community PlanUnderway. complete
10Provide enhanced support for small business 1) maximize participation in the provincial and federal programs, 2) tech assistance by helping less tech savvy business owners quickly scale solutions, 3) utilize existing programs and education forums to encourage business growth, 4) guidance and support to pivot businesses with modified operations, service models and create new business models, 5) build digital capacity to introduce or increase e-Commerce options, 6) counselling for cash flow management, business concept review, revenue stream analysis, and marketing support, 7) create a toolkit for business, 8) tax relief strategies.Approved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - Covid Concierge service launched on February 18, 2021.complete
11Ensure the City leads with social and local procurement. Hamilton already a Social Procurement program in place and it could be an important part of the recovery for both the NFP/social service sector, as well and job seekers who might be otherwise left behind.Referred to staff/financial consideration.
12City have more of an open mind about creative solutions (outdoor space); Help create attractive and safe walkable streets; Invest in the streetscapes; Continue outdoor dining program in future years so patios are less expensive and easier to set up. AGCO/road closure guidelines, permitting/ Increase in sustainable transportation; Simplify street closure applicationsReferred to staff. Downtown Dining Expansion was approved October 6, 2020 at Planning Committee and extended until October 31, 2021. Application for Street Art Festival submitted to Healthy Communities Initiative in March 2021. complete
13Focus on local tourism. Reorient portion of tourism budget to support local BIAs across city to localize tourism; Ensure local tourism branches/ visitors center are in all local areas to bring people all the areas of the city; Utilize tourism funds for beautification efforts on main streets and BIAsApproved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - Additional funding to BIAs approved ($10K each) in 2021. Five videos to increase consumer confidence in supporting Hamilton businesses produced by Tourism Hamilton and Economic Development. To be released in late Feb - late March. Hamilton Street Art Festival project approved by Council on Feb 25 to be submitted to Healthy Communities Initiative Grant Program. complete
14For food delivery and courier services - increase opportunities for flexible parking strategies to accommodate curbside pickup and food delivery services. Implement free parking strategies.Removing rush hour parking restrictions in various commercial areas (Planning)complete
15Municipalities can further help NFPs and community organizations access
land. Use their zoning tools, as well as municipal loan guarantees, to help
community organizations maintain access to real estate (such as for community hubs or affordable housing) and perhaps even purchase assets that will be distressed . (Westmount in Montreal has created a zoning designation for church buildings that ensures they stay in community hands).
Referred to Planning and Economic Development staff.
16Ensure supports (money, loans, expertise, technology) are in place to allow
organizations the time to adjust and plan for the future.
Approved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - City forwarded advocacy letter for continued business supports to upper levels of government on January 25, 2021.complete
17Institute a Moratorium on commercial tenant evictions - would apply to businesses and NFPs with a license to operate; also initiate some Property tax breaks to help relieve some rent.Referred to Finance staff.
18Ensure government and private sector leaders view NFPs, charities, and social enterprises as equal partners in creating a future that is prosperous, equitable, and has a strong social fabric by ensuring seats at decision making tables.Refer to Chambers of Commerce. in-progress
19Ensure a sustainable food system, which is vulnerable at the moment (reliant on funds and food, which are not always predictable/in place).Referred to the EDAP 2021-2025.
20Mental health and addictions support (training for employers; supports for
individuals)
City forwarded advocacy letter for mental health and addiction supports.complete
21Training for NFP staff (and businesses) about serving people with mental health and addictionsReferred to Chambers of Commerce.in-progress
22Consider providing incentives for staff to get to work (such as reduced transit, recreational passes, etc.) Offer short-term training and certification opportunities in areas including mental health first aid, suicide prevention, CPR, first aid, NVCI, back care, hoyer lift training, etc. to improve job seekers' chances of being hired in these settings if they don't have post-secondary education. Offer employers additional incentives to hire full time vs. part time. This recommendation for NFPs that operate 24/7.Referred to multiple stakeholders
23Ensure the direct connection is made to the health and wellbeing of the community AND the economy. When people with disabilities, from racialized communities, those living below the poverty line, women, newcomers, youth, etc. have employment, employers and the overall economy benefit.City reviewing city policy framework (City's Manager Office).complete
24Invest in construction/infrastructure spending to help get people back to work and expand skilled trades opportunities. Move timelines up of projects already approved.Council has approved the City of Hamilton’s 2020 Tax Supported Capital Budget. Council’s approval supports $244M million gross in capital infrastructure projects in addition to in-year approved capital projects in 2019, resulting in a gross 2020 capital budget of $397.7M.in-progress
25Increase investments in skill development, skilled trades, micro training, micro credentialing, employment supports, employment readiness, education, retraining, placements, and employer incentives are policy and funding tools to support job seekers (including those with barriers and/or the already-marginalized groups who risk being left further behind) and the employment that will be key to economic recovery.Referred to the EDAP 2021-2025.

Update: June 29, 2021 - The YMCA Hamilton/Burlington/Brantford received $250,000 to provide free job-focused language training to 80 newcomers interested in, or currently employed in the food manufacturing sector. This provincially funded project aims to support newcomers and support Food and Beverage Manufacturers with gaining and retaining a skilled labour force. This partnership between Mohawk College, YMCA, and Food Processing Skills Canada demonstrates the value of bringing together community agencies, colleges, and the private sector in order to support and help 2,700 newcomers impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic start new jobs.
complete
26Identify the "jobs of the future" and the skills required. Service providers can then prepare training, retraining, and employment supports for those skills.Referred to the EDAP 2021-2025.
27Increase safe access to childcare in a way that enables providers to operate. The federal government was contemplating a subsidy for providers but that subsidy has not yet materialized.City forwarded advocacy letter for childcare supports. complete
28Encourage flexible work arrangements (continued work from home, or flexible hours, with technology support provided), especially for parents.Referred to City Human Resources staff.
29Use schedule, route, and fare tools to enable more access to transportation. Municipal (with government partnerships) - asap
-Transportation infrastructure, schedules, routes, fares, etc. Invest in transportation as part of construction/infrastructure spending (above).
Referred to Public Works staff (transportation). In addition, $192.9M Transit initiatives spending for 2021 Tax Supported Capital Budget including 13 additional buses.
30A genuinely inclusive, barrier-free planning for people with disabilities and universal design needs to include funding and enforcement to ensure it will be delivered.Referred to City Human Resources staff (Talent and Diversity Division)
31Operational Initiatives
- Improve speed on permitting and approvals for development to enable sustainable growth - Enhance and promote Job boards to support the needs of manufacturing and life sciences sectors
- Cultivate the supply chain within Hamilton/Ontario/Canada,
as a means to support manufacturing firms that converted to PPE or to those that provide component parts for multinationals; understanding that this might not necessarily be ‘buy local’, but can there be revisions to city procurement policy to factor local production or local suppliers within the supply chain instead of just lowest priced bids, or can City promote Hamilton PPE companies in federal / provincial grant and procurement programs
- Consider how to continue property tax deferral program for those companies in need, especially in the event of a second shutdown – this was beneficial to many companies but is lower priority given that the next instalment is due September 30 - Continue pandemic planning in strategic areas in the event of a second wave – e.g. childcare plans in place in the event of school closures to enable parents to keep working
Referred to PED staff.
32Transportation and Logistics infrastructure
– increase priority on preventative maintenance and timely repairs
– Ensure master traffic plans engage manufacturing to enable
optimum traffic flow
– Improve public transit to industrial areas/plants
(manufacturing companies interviewed did not see LRT as a high priority initiative) – Coordinate with industry regarding public transit needs
(timing, routes)
Referred to staff (transportation). In addition, $192.9M Transit initiatives spending for 2021 Tax Supported Capital Budget including on demand transit and continuing the (RE) ENVISION THE HSR process that will propose network design guidelines and action plans in 2021.
33Strategic initiatives
- Identify programs, resources and partners that City can support to enable postsecondary institutions (Mohawk, McMaster) to expand and build on both academic programs and short courses for industries that are experiencing labour shortages and skills gaps – i.e. training for not only current
students as well as re-training of existing workforce
- Promote and champion Hamilton region as the Advanced Manufacturing hub of Canada – establish an Advanced Manufacturing council
- Champion Hamilton region’s on-going transformation as a
Life Sciences Cluster – support of Synapse Life Sciences Consortium
- Consider strategic development of Bayfront lands as an advanced manufacturing campus that combines academia, training, ancillary services
- Continue to promote and champion Hamilton’s reputation as an attractive and livable city to attract and retain skilled workforce
Referred to the EDAP 2021-2025. FedDev Ontario awarded Innovation Factory and Synapse Consortium $6M in funding that will result in 50 new jobs and maintain 100 others. This announcement is a boost to Hamilton’s biotech and health sciences accelerators and is expected to attract another $7.5 million in capital or in-kind services.

Update: June 29, 2021 - The YMCA Hamilton/Burlington/Brantford received $250,000 to provide free job-focused language training to 80 newcomers interested in, or currently employed in the food manufacturing sector. This provincially funded project aims to support newcomers and support Food and Beverage Manufacturers with gaining and retaining a skilled labour force. This partnership between Mohawk College, YMCA, and Food Processing Skills Canada demonstrates the value of bringing together community agencies, colleges, and the private sector in order to support and help 2,700 newcomers impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic start new jobs.
complete
34Continued support of Federal and Provincial programs
- Corporate Tax deferral programs and advocacy on potential future extensions
- Federal /provincial transfers to municipalities to cover budget shortfalls
- Continued support for CEWS extension / transition plans (July to Nov)
- Support for assistance / subsidy for companies that have reduced productivity due to COVID-related plant preparations (e.g. many companies lose 1 hour of productivity per shift due to sanitization measures and reimbursement for
increased PPE costs for companies
Approved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - City forwarded advocacy letter supporting tax deferral programs supports to upper levels of government on January 25, 2021.complete
35Procurement policies that promote Canadian
manufactured goods
- transfer federal / provincial procurement dollars to municipalities to provide pro-Canadian decision opportunities at a City level
- Emphasize the climate / environmental benefit and security of supply for buying local
- Opportunity for City (Mayor, Council, government relations staff) to promote and raise awareness of Hamilton manufacturers for provincial and federal funding programs to ensure Hamilton companies are getting access and visibility
Referred to the EDAP 2021-2025
36Support of federal trade policies and their continued
improvements – massive impact to manufacturing given
changing global trade flows and US policies.
- Open commercial borders with US, i.e. US232 tariff on aluminum and steel
- Maximize benefits of new NAFTA, especially auto parts
City forwarded advocacy letter supporting federal trade policies.complete
37Regulatory Environment – red tape reduction
– Advocate in policy and zoning matters to protect Farm and rural business viability
– Attract and encourage agricultural inputs suppliers to locate in rural areas (e.g. seed and feed suppliers, grading and packing facilities, large animal veterinarians, food storage and processing facilities)
– Maintain the farmland tax property rate proportional to other tax classes (i.e. lower the rate to maintain farmland share of tax burden to offset the disproportionate increase in farmland values)
– Streamline and assist businesses with approval processes (e.g. drainage works, CBO, CAs, NEC, Greenbelt, planning department, building department etc.)
Referred to the EDAP 2021-2025 and Planning staff.
38Support Local food production
– Implement municipal policies and investments in infrastructure to support agriculture and food processing – Invest in the maintenance of drains, ditches, roads and infrastructure necessary to move agricultural equipment
and transport agri-food products
– Establish agriculture, agri-food and rural Community Improvement Plan to encourage agri-food business expansion, revitalization and stimulate rural
economic development
– Provide specialized assistance to businesses identified as critical to the agricultural sector in Hamilton
– Host value chain networking workshops to encourage local connections between farmers, processors, distributors, retailers, food service, etc.
– Facilitate connections between local institutions (e.g. municipal, hospital, etc.) and local producers to encourage local food procurement.
– Investigate feasibility of local food infrastructure based on identified gaps (e.g. food processing hub, food aggregation and distribution)
– Continue to move forward on Hamilton’s food strategy to support local food security for low income families.
Referred to the EDAP 2021-2025 and Economic Development staff
39Rural Connectivity – Look for ways to expand access to rural Hamilton resident’s and businesses. Strategic economic investments, like expanding reliable internet and cell phone access, will stimulate job creation, contribute to affordable community development, and deliver economic growth and prosperity for all Hamiltonians.
– Develop partnerships with the provincial and federal governments and internet and cellular service providers to invest and expand services in the Hamilton area
Referred to the EDAP 2021-2025 and staff (Chief Digital Officer). The City via Office of the Mayor and Digital Office provided letters of support to all Telcos/ISP that submitting applications to either Provincial ICON program and/or Federal Universal Broadband Fund program. One successful application included $441,200 in funding for Bell Canada to bring high-speed Internet to rural Ontario residents. Bell will contribute $1,286,200 toward this project that will connect 756 underserved households to high-speed Internet in the following communities and surrounding rural areas: Ashgrove, Campbellville, Carlisle, Cedar Springs, Freelton, Hornby, Morriston, Waterdown and other areas just outside Milton. In addition, CRTC has announced that Cogeco has been awarded funding for their Hamilton 1 project that will provide fibre backhaul (transport) to Jerseyville. In addition, the City has a Broadband/High Speed Internet Survey in progress that was heavily promoted to Rural areas.

Update: The Ontario Government has announced Ontario Connect, a historic investment plan that will ensure 100 per cent high speed internet connectivity for all by the end of 2025. https://news.ontario.ca/en/release/1000538/historic-investment-plan-ensures-access-to-high-speed-internet-for-all
complete
40Rural Boundary Protection and Environmental Support
– Establish a firm urban boundary to protect agricultural lands, natural resources, and prevent sprawl that drastically increases greenhouse gas emissions and infrastructure costs. Hamilton’s best opportunity to meet
ambitious climate change targets will be to maintain its large rural land base that provides many benefits to the environment.
– Permanent urban boundaries a designed to limit the loss of agricultural land, thereby focusing future urban growth within existing urban boundaries. This means urban growth primarily through redevelopment of vacant and
underused lands, and higher density development.
– In urban areas, higher density development should be mandated province-wide to take full advantage of existing infrastructure.
– Urban areas should only be allowed to expand onto abutting agricultural lands only after exhausting redevelopment of underused or vacant areas within their existing urban boundaries. This would include the rehabilitation and redevelopment of both “greyfield” and “brownfield” sites.
– Urban expansion onto abutting agricultural land must be directed onto lower class agricultural land adjacent to the existing urban boundaries
– Promote environmental BMPs with farmers for a better balance of economics and environment on Hamilton farms
– Encourage public awareness of environmental BMPs on farms and their value as environmental goods and services.
Referred to staff (Planning - GRIDS Process)
41Create mid-sized venues useful for live performance. This could be new
construction or conversion of old spaces. Venues would need to be affordable to all artists and accessible.
Administration might be shared between venues. One administrative staff keeping up with these venues would keep administrative costs low and allow artists to keep their costs low as well.
Bridgeworks facility open. St Marks adaptive reuse project underway.
42Hamilton should have a film commissioner to promote Hamilton’s vibrant film/tv community to the industry and film events proactively, and also promote our tax credit incentive which is one of the highest within Canada at 45%. This would further push Hamilton during these times given our
better control of COVID while the majority of America is still shut-down.
More industry outreach is needed within the industry itself - many people who are in film/tv in Hamilton don’t know of others who are in in this sector in Hamilton. A film commissioner can do this.
Film Commissioner role in place in Tourism and Culture. City is already supporting networking/education events for local industry, e.g. Canada Film Day: virtual event/panel to engage Hamilton industry has been planned for April 22, quarterly Creative Exchange virtual networking events in place. Correction: tax credit is not Hamilton-specific and is not a flat 45%. Tax credits apply to all of Ontario; regional bonus applies to all cities outside of the GTA zone and only certain productions are eligible.complete
43For example - waive film permit fees for the next few months.Approved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - All General Business License Fees, Trade License Fees, Taxi and Personal Transportation Providers (PTP) Fees, and Film Permit Fees be frozen at 2020 levels for 2021.complete
44When feasible, invite senior management and board members from the Canadian Film Centre to Hamilton. The current chair is the owner of the company that makes Murdoch Mysteries - they film in Hamilton regularly.Referred to staff (Tourism and Culture).
451) Reinstate the Anti-Racism Resource Centre, as an independent, arms length
organization, to support arts organizations (and other organizations) across Hamilton to build their capacity to do anti-racism, anti-oppression, Equity Diversity Inclusion work in their organizations with assessment
metrics.
2) City funding should divest from cultural institutions that are not actively working to decolonize and dismantle anti-Black and anti-Indigenous racism within their organizations - put evaluative metrics into place that make City funding conditional on addressing institutional racism/inequities.
3) Create a policy to have a minimum of one- third of the seats for Coalition of Black and Racialized Artists members and/or BIPOC representation on the City of Hamilton Arts Advisory Committee at all times.
4) City Enrichment Fund to establish a dedicated, strategic funding stream (much like many other funders have done) for BIPOC, LGBTQ+, and other equity-seeking artists and cultural producers at various stages in their careers.
1) The HARRC report with a new board of directors/independent board was approved at Hamilton City Council on February 24, 2021 (CM20007(b)) with $50,000 approved for HARCC project next steps. 3) Referred to Arts Advisory Commission (AAC) and Tourism and Culture Staff. The AAC discussed BIPOC representation at its meeting in January and is developing suggested language to guide future recruitment. 2) & 4)the City Enrichment Fund undergoing an Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) Review. EDI survey was sent out to previous and current CEF applicants (optional). Results have been compiled. Findings to be presented to the May 28th Grants Sub-committee meeting.
complete
461) Strategize an action plan with long term solutions for a new economic
model for the sector that is stable and supports the growth of its workers, cultural producers, and the culture of marginalized communities in sustainable ways to thrive. Create a working group after this taskforce that can look at this.
Referred to staff (Tourism and Culture).
471) Invest in the future of the sector by resourcing emerging BIPOC artists and cultural workers with mentorship, recognition, and other opportunities to nourish their continued growth and success in the field. This could also be the role of a new working group as mentioned above.
Advocate for more funding for this provincially and federally through the Ontario Arts Council, the Canada Council and Canadian Heritage.
2) Create opportunities for BIPOC artists, curators, and community members to re-interpret permanent collections held in institutions from their own truths, knowledge, lived experiences, and languages. 3) Create opportunities for BIPOC youth to train and develop skills in the areas of film, music and media arts to be more readily able to join the arts labour force.
Referred to Tourism and Culture staff. Funding being sought for Hamilton Street Art Festival- incudes specific community arts projects for the BIPOC arts community. Part of this work is being undertaken as part of the City's Indigenous Landmarks Working Group
481) Additional funding for fashion businesses and designers to assist emerging
businesses/designers and existing ones scale up/increase client base.
2) Provide support by continuing to offer programs that focus on business planning and marketing such as Digital Main St Program and virtual business coaching that help businesses pivot and/or scale up.
Virtual business coaching program (Business Canvas Model) initiated in 2020 and continues into 2021 to assist existing businesses in changing or modifying and/or new businesses start-up or expand in Hamilton. Additional funding secured for Digital Main St. Referred to staff (Tourism and Culture & Hamilton Business Centre) to identify other opportunities. complete
49Work Force Development: attraction, retention and development/training for fashion workers.
There are immediate and significant needs for skilled/trained fashion workers (those who make the clothes). Current workers who produced clothing are retiring and in order to grow businesses and scale up fashion businesses more workers are greatly needed. Hamilton doesn’t have a local provider who trains in ‘fashion production’ so the recommendation is for the city to identify, develop partnerships (i.e. provincial, federal etc.), and work with a trainer (i.e. similar to Toronto’s Fashion Exchange Program) to offer some funding that will assist with the development of a program that trains and provides paid work experience for fashion workers.
City to also assist with attraction of skilled workers who are often trained outside of Canada. This must be done with living wages and safe working conditions.
Referred to the EDAP 2021-2025 and Tourism and Culture staff.
50Give arts organizations and businesses property tax forgiveness.Approved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - Letter forwarded to upper levels of government to extend the eligibility for the Creative Enterprise Facilities Property Tax Sub-class to the City of Hamilton and that the Province support extending the Creative Enterprise Facilities Property Tax Sub-class to the City of Hamilton. Finance staff be directed to report back to the General Issues Committee with options for creating such a sub-class.in-progress
51Better access to technology for arts organizations in order to be able to deliver online programming. This could happen through an equipment bank held at the HPL as part of its maker space.
Hamilton Arts Council could play a lead role in organizing knowledge workshops.
Referred to Hamilton Public Library and Hamilton Arts Council
52Website to let Hamiltonians know what’s open/not in the arts sector in Hamilton.Underway. The AAC supported the Arts Council's online local arts communication/listings project with seed funding in the amount of $5,500 in fall 2020. The project has since received federal grant support in the amount of $90K. The Arts Council is currently surveying the community regarding needs for the site.complete
53Update the City of Hamilton’s music strategy to provide a direction for industry recovery and ensure goals are relevant and speak to current industry needs. Seek a new report with recommendations from industry experts on City of Hamilton music policy.Underway in partnership with the Chamber, Sonic Unyon, HPL. Media announcement released March 2021. complete
54Assist with reopening venues and other arts-businesses by providing continued health & safety, licensing, and by-law support through the small business centre.Support provided through new Concierge Program and Tourism and Culture staff.complete
551) Lobby provincial and federal government to continue current granting programs at full funding amounts for arts organizations to ensure sustainability.
2) Ensure CEF funding continues to provide full regular funding to organizations in 2021 that pay artists and arts industry workers to ensure employment continuation within our industries, that also include equity metrics as referenced above. Consider creating an additional one-
time grant for CEF 2021 to support the careers of the hardest hit artists (BIPOC) and COVID-related hardships of individual artists and musicians over the next year.
- Create “minimum wage” pay scale for musicians hired by the City and at
city-related/sanctioned events, to ensure musicians are paid fairly as reopening happens and afterwards
- Lobby provincially and federally to ensure that CERB (or equivalent program) continues for musicians and gig-workers who are unable to return to work due to gathering constraints. Ensure that the CEWS wage subsidy continues for organizations supporting arts workers.
Includes multiple actions. Referred to staff/financial consideration. 2) Fair Wage for Musicians Policy in development following motion approved by Council on February 25, 2021 and scheduled report back in June. complete
56That municipal funding be allocated immediately for ‘Phase 3 Recovery’ to for-
profit live music venues that don’t currently qualify for municipal funding (like CEF) and meet the following guidelines:
1) COVID-19 IMPACT:
- a brick & mortar establishment that was forced to close in March due to the
provincial decisions pertaining to COVID-19 - a brick & mortar establishment that was not granted the ability to re-open until late July 2020 under limited capacity, with important health & safety guidelines to presenting live events
2) DEFINITION OF LIVE MUSIC VENUE:
- establishment whose primary use is the presentation of live music
- predominantly charges “admission” to the public to access the live music
presentations
- invests in ‘live music infrastructure’ to present such as staging, lighting, PA system, ticketing area, promotion expenditures
- compensates artists fairly for their live performances depending on the program and requirements, this recommendation could include support to other for-profit arts & culture businesses that demonstrate an equivalent high need and impact on artists and arts workers.
Referred to Finance and Tourism and Culture staff.
57Funding for tourism sectors who will be very slow to recover from this, to keep them surviving until they can thrive again.Referred to Tourism and Culture staff.
58Provide a playbook which helps provide a solid guide for businesses and organizations about current pandemic rules and protocols.
Outline the specific guidelines for hosting events safely within the
current numbers that are approved.
Provide industry connections/resources such as TIAO and
HHBRTO for the tourism sector.
Concierge Program complete
59Lobby the government to look at percentages of capacity, rather than a fixed number (ie fifty people) as the venues differ by maximum capacities.The Ontario Chamber of Commerce has advocated and the province has made capacity restrictions based on percentages throughout the pandemic.
Although there are still ceilings being implemented through every stage, they will increase along with percentage occupancy as we move forward and begin to reopen.
complete
60Encourage the city to work with the province in seeking clarity on what comes next relative to measuring status over the coming weeks/months, recognizing that the “second wave” concerns tied to the fall weather change and children returning to schools. How are we evaluating our progress relative to further relaxation of restrictions or regression towards tighter restrictions or lockdowns? Is there a common measurement metric & can that be publicized and explained? Daily case count, hospital occupancy, or another? How is this applied regionally versus province wide? Clarity on this progress and how it’s being measured, would help provide some certainty across sectors as they plan next steps in the coming quarter.City continues to work with the province on restrictions and protocols and how it affects industry.complete
61Local/Provincial public health working with larger sector/industry
to proactively develop next phase of re-opening criteria in a COVID environment. Relate required planning to that of school re-openings. What is
required to ensure public safety all-the-while allowing business to progress
toward normal operating capacity? This will also provide consumers
the benefit of understanding what precautions are being taken as they
consider their own decisions about what activities to resume or not.
Referred to Hamilton Public Health and local partners/Hamilton Chamber of Commerce who are working with IPAC (Infection Prevention and Control Canada) on workplace protocols and procedures.complete
62Encourage clarity around the future of the CEWS regulations beyond
November including lobbying for the continuation of existing benefits
(min 75% recovery) for the hardest hit sectors like those represented in our
working group. This is the only way to avoid mass layoffs in this sector.
Approved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - City forwarded advocacy letter to upper levels of government on January 25, 2021.complete
63An extension of Termination and Severance Protection beyond January
2, 2021. Many of the employees in our businesses and sectors in general
continue to be laid off. Extending legislation beyond January 2021 is
crucial for businesses most impacted
Approved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - City forwarded advocacy letter to upper levels of government focused on extension of Termination and Severance Protection on January 25, 2021. complete
64Communication to residents of Hamilton about the impact of visitors from other communities. - The safety measures in place to reduce the risks
- The economic value to the City and its residents
- Clarity on what people can and cannot do if they use local facilities such as
attractions, events, hotels and restaurants
- The impact it is, or isn’t, having on Covid cases to the community
Approved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - Covid Concierge service launched on February 18, 2021.complete
65Communication to surrounding areas regarding visitation to Hamilton
- The safety and economic value of vacationing closer to home
- Clarity on what they can and cannot do when they visit
- Help direct them from overused facilities to under used areas
Approved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - Covid Concierge service launched on February 18, 2021. Tourism Hamilton website reflects direction of EOC and Hamilton's most current status within the Provincial framework redirecting to the City's website where applicable. complete
66Staying connected and relevant to your
market, members, supporters and community. Whether your business is
partially open, virtual only, or completely closed
it is important to stay in touch so that your supporters will be there when you are ready to welcome them back in physically.
Tourism & Culture and Economic Development produced and released five public oriented videos to increase consumer confidence.complete
67Champion street closures and placemaking projects that help revitalize main streets and support local businesses, attractions and tourism facilities. Sponsor all season social distanced outdoor activities by normalizing outdoor gatherings. Encourage patrons for the weather, rather than using carbon producing heating equipment when possible.Approved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - Launch of public space animation initiative & Winterfest Motion ($25,000) for additional programming. King William Gate public art project to be installed in May to facilitate closing of King William St for on street events. Hamilton Street Art Festival 2021 Healthy Communities Initiative Grant application includes placemaking enhancements to outdoor spaces that will allow more places for safe outdoor gathering.complete
68Establish a major tourism marketing campaign for Spring 2021 utilizing existing outdoor infrastructure. Local attractions, such as the Peach Festival, Art Crawl and Supercrawl can be redesigned with additional COVID safety protocols in mind in larger facilities such is the Ancaster Fair Grounds or Tim Horton’s Field. Be clear and transparent with the public akin to supporting local restaurant call to action – the local tourism & hospitality industry needs your support.
Inspire Local pride and support.
Referred to staff (Tourism and Culture). Marketing plan in place and messaging will be subject to public health restrictions. Any redesign of community led events is the role of the event organizers. All activities including public health restrictions are subject to provincial orders.
69Dedicate resources (people) to best-practice research within the sector to seek solutions for re-opening in specific sub-sectors that have been successful elsewhere as a guide to implement in Hamilton. Think regionally, provincially, nationally and internationally. How has New Zealand successfully re-opened convention centers? How is the NFL putting fans in stadiums? What is leading to success and progress?Referred to staff.
70A clear distinction should be made between the nature of business meetings & events and that of mass gatherings. The World Health Organization defines mass gatherings as events that have the potential of compromising the medical system where the “number of people attending is sufficient to strain the planning and response resources of the community, or nation hosting the event.” A phased and graduated approach to reintroduce smaller meetings and events should be considered similar to what has occurred introduced in areas such as BC, Quebec and Nova Scotia. Business events are generally held in lower risk environments, and can be more easily controlled through pre-registration, overall counts and contact tracing. Social distancing practices, proper sanitization controls and food safety measures can be implemented by qualified staff. Hamilton’s meetings and events industry is by nature ready for this controlled restart and being given the green light to do so is vitally important for this industry to move forward in any capacity.Action unclear. Referred to staff (Tourism and Culture). Events remain subject to restrictions.
71Single Point of AuthorityApproved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - Covid Concierge service launched on February 18, 2021.complete
72Expansion of Commercial Rent Assistance ProgramApproved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - City forwarded advocacy letter to upper levels of government focused on Commercial Rent Assistance Program on January 25, 2021. complete
73Support for an Innovative Pilot ProgramReferred to the EDAP 2021-2025.
74Bylaw EnforcementApproved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - Covid Concierge service launched on February 18, 2021.complete
75Well-being supports for EmployeesApproved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - Covid Concierge service launched on February 18, 2021.complete
76Transportation Infrastructure (LRT, Expansion, Full Schedule)Referred to staff (transportation). In addition, $192.9M Transit initiatives spending for 2021 Tax Supported Capital Budget including on demand transit and continuing the (RE) ENVISION THE HSR process that will propose network design guidelines and action plans in 2021.
77Network InfrastructureReferred to the EDAP 2021-2025.
78Placemaking in support of well-being and healthy workplacesApproved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - Launch of public space animation initiative & Winterfest Motion ($25,000) for additional programming. King William Gate public art project to be installed in May to facilitate closing of King William St for on street events. Hamilton Street Art Festival 2021 Healthy Communities Initiative Grant application incudes placemaking enhancements to outdoor spaces that will allow more places for safe outdoor gathering.complete
79Occupational Health and Safety requirementsApproved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - Covid Concierge service launched on February 18, 2021.complete
80Occupational Health and Safety supports for small business and not-for-profitApproved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - City forwarded advocacy letter to upper levels of government focused on small business and not-for-profit supports on January 25,2021.complete
81Universal Paid Emergency Leave AdvocacyCity forwarded advocacy letter to upper levels of government focused on Universal Paid Emergency Leave. complete
82Municipal Champion for funding supportsAt the March 31, 2021 City Council meeting, a new Commercial Vacancy Assistance Program was approved. This temporary two-year program was developed in response to COVID and intended to mitigate the potential for street-facing commercial vacancies. This program would be available to prospective tenants seeking to establish a new business location or test a location in the form of a ‘pop-up’ venture.complete
83Sources for PPE and related required materialsApproved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - Covid Concierge service launched on February 18, 2021.complete
84Façade Grant Program to include outdoor patio spaces.The original recommendation referred to the purchase of patio furniture. The city’s existing commercial property improvement programs support permanent physical improvements including the creation of new outdoor patios/decks adjacent to a street. Under proposed changes to this program grant eligibility would be expanded to include the creation of patios/decks located anywhere on a property (not just those facing a street) and could now include rear/laneway patios or rooftop patios (where permitted).Not Complete
85Ground Transportation
- Support the acceleration of the City’s, Province and Federal transportation plans.
- Build awareness of the vision behind City of Hamilton’s transportation plan. Advance shovel ready projects that jumpstart the economy
- MTO should identify and designate a right of way for the NGTA Corridor as a first step to constructing the highway and specify timelines for the construction of this connecting corridor, as an initial step to getting it built.
Referred to the EDAP 2021-2025 and PED staff. In addition, $192.9M Transit initiatives spending for 2021 Tax Supported Capital Budget including on demand transit and continuing the (RE) ENVISION THE HSR process that will propose network design guidelines and action plans in 2021.
86Goods Movement
- All municipalities across the Trade Corridor should closely monitor technological advancement conduct pilot projects as a first step to large-scale rollout.
- Develop Business Parks where land is planned such that freight hubs or clusters are located nearer to complementary uses. Build supply logistics opportunities and capacity (e.g. additional warehousing, increased manufacturing and innovative distribution systems).
- Execute Transportation Plans (Freight and Goods Movement Strategy) Obtain data including last mile analytics. Understand
technological enhancements.
- The MTO, in partnership with the OTA, should build on its ongoing study of truck parking needs to implement a strategic truck parking plan to serve the needs of the trucking industry in our trade corridor.
Referred to the EDAP 2021-2025 and PED staff.
87Goods Movement
- Ensure Hamilton is manufacturing sufficient supply of PPE, medical supplies, and equipment.
- Obtain critical infrastructure designation from government. The Province and municipalities should support a quick completion of the approval process so that privately funded infrastructure is built without delay.
Referred to the EDAP 2021-2025
88Travel and Tourism
- Implement measures to stimulate travel to promote regional travel to Hamilton with Tourism Hamilton and other regional partners such as Hamilton Halton Brant Regional Tourism Association *Based on provincial guidelines”.
- Promote Hamilton’s ‘shop local’ campaigns. Create awareness of all the outdoor opportunities/venues for tourism
– Create new open space options with businesses with excess capacity to rent.
Shop local campaign implemented in Fall 2020 and continues. Five videos to increase consumer confidence in supporting Hamilton businesses produced by Tourism Hamilton and Economic Development. Broader regional promotion is subject to restrictions.
Awaiting further direction from
Province on Rediscover Ont Tax Credit program outlined in fall budget.
Outdoor opportunities subject to framework /restrictions and not wanting to encourage restricted hotspots from coming to Hamilton to enjoy outdoor activities.
complete
89Ride sharing programs
- Support alternative modes of transportation such as UBER, Lyft, SOBI that provide safe and accessible transportation for workers and tourism.
- Scale the use of public transit vehicles to meet demand.
Multiple actions. Referred to staff (transportation).
90Public Transit
- Continue to advocate for the $1B investment from the province. These monies should be directed to shovel ready projects (including buildings and infrastructure).
- Meetings with Premier, Mayor, elected officials introduced calling Federal Government to the discussions regarding support for LRT.
The City Manager recently wrote a letter at Council direction to the Province of Ontario asking Metrolinx for status on $1B investmentcomplete
91Partnerships Collaborations (Health and Wellbeing)
- Lobby Province to allocate funding for recovery of healthcare, substance abuse,mental health and other key areas.
City forwarded an advocacy letter in support of funding for recovery of healthcare, substance abuse,mental health and other key areas.complete
92COVID Preparedness, Prevention, and Safety on Construction Sites
- Ensure there is awareness of proper public health and COVID-19 measures are in place. Support proper protocols and procedures for return to work and ensuring development sites can get to full activity and strength in the safest
way.
Concierge Program complete
93Hamilton Fair Wage Policy reflects local ICI prevailing wage
- Advocate to support prevailing wage language for local construction workers.
- Advocate to support prevailing fair wages and consistent fair policies for local
contractors and workers.
Referred to staff
94Construction Contractor Challenges
- City Purchasing Department and Public Works to work with local contractors affected by these unprecedented challenges caused by the pandemic and the mandatory provincial shutdowns.
- City Purchasing Department and Public Works Department meet and strategize with local contractors affected by these additional public health measures to find win, win, win solutions.
- The City can help eliminate future COVID-19 exposures this Fall by having Public Health Office coordinate closer with MOL and small/ mid sized contractors who are at the greatest risk of workplace exposures due to limited resources and smaller operational scale.
Multiple actions. Referred to Procurement, Public Health and Public Works staff.
95Labour
- Expand and build on academic programs to include supply chain industry where there continues to be a shortage.
- City procurement strategy should support local supply chain including apprenticeship development and training of skilled trades.
- Advocate for WSIB claims to align with the impacts of COVID-19 and uncertainties in all sectors.
- COVID Preparedness: Advocate to the province to designate key City assets as Critical Provincial Infrastructure (Airport) and deemed essential.
- Ensure any future restrictions on construction projects does not interfere with the critical movement of goods, PPE, etc.
- City offices to reopen and accelerate process to get Hamilton moving, through return of administrative departments, council meetings, approvals, acceleration of process to encourage development.
Approved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - City forwarded an advocacy letter in support of various items including ensuring fair wages/consistent policy for workers WSIB claims to align with COVID-19 impacts on January 25,2021.complete
96Labour: Safety Prevention and PPE
- Explore measures that would require mandatory testing for critical sectors (i.e. if second wave occurs) and develop rapid testing and delivery of results.
- Task Force and city stakeholders should endorse and support the COVID-19 Alert App to help assist Public Health with COVID-19 tracking and tracing.
Referred to Public Health staff. In addition, city staff promoted the use of the COVID-19 Alert App.
97Labour: Safety on Building and Construction sites
- Support proper protocols and procedures for return to work and ensuring development sites can get to full activity and strength in the safest way.
Referred to Hamilton Public Health and local partners/Hamilton Chamber of Commerce who are working with IPAC (Infection Prevention and Control Canada) on workplace protocols and procedures.
98Building Capacity
- Accelerate development of business parks and AEGD lands (servicing, planning, etc.)
- Continue promoting Hamilton business parks as current policies make parks competitive and attractive.
- Accelerate future major infrastructure projects through coordinated funding through the province and federal levels of government.
- Advance shovel ready and “shovel worthy” core infrastructure projects (roads, transit, water, wastewater).
- Create a list of priority projects and ensure Province is in receipt for consideration and inclusion into the Fall 2020 Budget.
Referred to the EDAP 2021-2025
99Process Improvement: Expediting Processes and Improving Contract Delivery and Execution
- Encourage the City to adopt process changes that include adequate resources and staff support.
- Ensure expediting changes can continue into the future.
- Encourage hiring of more City staff.
- Encourage municipalities to accept surety bonds as financial security for projects to secure municipal agreements.
- Lobby and advocate at provincial level and provide support for partner associations (OHBA, CHBA, other local HBA’s) lobbying for similar issues and efforts.
Finance working on surety bonds review. complete
100Process Improvements: Ensuring Confidence in Hamilton and the Market for all Sectors
- Ensure working relationships with City staff and stakeholders for collaboration on process improvements to attract new homeowners, business owners, developers, tourism etc.
- Provide new ideas to City staff and council, for joint efforts at provincial level for policy change regarding building reserve funds. WEHBA to discuss topic further with City staff in future.
- Encourage staff and Council to explore changes to parking requirements through task force as an opportunity for economic recovery and stimulus.
- Pursue stimulus funding to get projects moving.
Housing Department working on building permit reserve review.
101Supply of Land to Support Supply of Housing
- Lobbying and advocacy at provincial level with growth-related policies and land needs assessments to ensure land supply will continue or if boundary expansions are necessary.
- Build on existing municipal incentives to encourage new housing and affordable housing options.
- Keep people living and working in Hamilton with continued support to the housing and development industry.
Approved December 9, 2020 GIC motion - Motion approved for Affordable Housing Projects - Cash-in-lieu Parking Policy – Downtown Secondary Plan Area and forwarded a letter to the province on December 17,2020. At the April 6,2021 Planning Committee meeting, committee approved to modify the City’s existing Cash-In-Lieu of Parking (CILP) Policy to provide for a temporary, reduced cash-in-lieu of parking fee within the Downtown Secondary Plan (DTSP) Area for an 18th month period. Staff will review the usage of the policy at the end of this temporary period. In addition, the 2021 Tax Supported Capital Budget included $30.3M towards housing initiatives.complete
102Lobbying and Advocacy
- Advocacy and awareness.
- Encourage partnerships and collaborations with similar stakeholders for collective messaging and lobbying efforts at provincial and federal level.
Approved December 9, 2020 GIC motion -City forwarded an advocacy letter supporting partnerships and collaborations with all levels of government on December 17,2020 and January 25,2021.complete
103Development Industry as a Tool for Economic Recovery –Jobs and Infrastructure
- Support lobbying efforts for economic and job-related efforts with development and industry associations.
- Ensure construction and development are “essential” and will not get shut down again.
- Encourage City Council to support the initiative of a home renovation tax credit at other levels of government – OHBA pushing for a provincial HRTC as an economic stimulus as it provides an effective tool for combating underground ‘cash’ economy and protects integrity of renovators, contractors etc. as well as the provincial tax base.
-Ensure incentives provided by the government has obligations to keep investment and create sustainable jobs in the region.
City forwarded advocacy letter to upper levels of government focused on home renovation tax credit. complete

Council Priorities and current status

For the remainder of the 2018 to 2022 Term of Council, the administration will be prioritizing Climate Change and Equity, Diversity and Inclusion as two of the eight Term of Council Priorities.

Climate Change Goal: Reduce community-wide greenhouse gas emissions to achieve net zero before 2050 (over 2006 baseline). Interim targets of 20% by 2020 and 50% by 2030.

Equity, Diversity & Inclusion Goal: Equity-seeking communities will feel safe, supported and have an enhanced sense of belonging through strengthening community capacity, City responsiveness and creating inclusive engagement opportunities.

Climate Action

ActionPriority Areas of ActionLinked ToRecommendationStatus
1Immediately establish a municipal home energy retrofit (HERO) program for homeowners, with a plan to extend retrofit support to commercial and multi-residential buildings in the futureR103Encourage City Council to support the initiative of a home renovation tax credit at other levels of government
2Continue to advocate for the LRT and invest in the electrification and expansion of transitR76Transportation Infrastructure (LRT, Expansion, Full Schedule)
3Help local manufacturers transition to a carbon-free future through advancing waste heat recovery, and other energy efficiency practices, and a shift to alternative fuel sources such as hydrogen.New Recommendation / Action
4Champion street closures & placemaking projects through all seasons to help revitalize main streets and support local businesses through the winter months.R67Champion street closures and placemaking projects that help revitalize main streets and support local businesses, attractions and tourism facilities.
5Support investments in broadband internet services to support working and learning from home beyond the crisis; this is especially important in underserviced and rural communities.R39Rural Connectivity – Look for ways to expand access to rural Hamilton resident’s and businesses. Strategic economic investments, like expanding reliable internet and cell phone access, will stimulate job creation, contribute to affordable community development, and deliver economic growth and prosperity for all Hamiltonians.
6Develop “shovel ready” zero carbon affordable housing projects. Support the “Hamilton is Home” proposal to provide 3,000 affordable housing units in three years.R101Build on existing municipal incentives to encourage new housing and affordable housing options.

Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI)

ActionPriority Areas of ActionLinked ToRecommendationStatus
1Universal Childcare
We recognize that workforce participation is key for economic recovery and universal childcare is critical for Hamilton’s economic recovery plans, including coordination between the reopening of schools and childcare centres, as well as, advocating for a national universal childcare program.
R27City forwarded advocacy letter for childcare supports.
2Paid Sick Leave
Racialized workers, particularly Black women, are over-represented in front-facing essential service provider roles, including among Personal Support Workers and Registered Practical Nurses. Many are providing essential services, yet unable to access emergency paid sick leave. Emergency paid sick leave recognizes the sacrifices front-line and essential workers provide during a pandemic.
R81Universal Paid Emergency Leave Advocacy
3Transit
Accessible, public transit is essential for residents to get to jobs and requires adequate and enhanced routes, affordable fares structures, and capacity and scheduling planning as long as safety is a concern. The need for public transit to more remote and industrial areas across the City of Hamilton requires coordination with industry to ensure workers can get to work safely.
R76Transportation Infrastructure (LRT, Expansion, Full Schedule)
4Housing
Homelessness and insufficient housing are barriers to economic recovery. Hamilton has seen a growing supply crisis through this pandemic and more social and affordable housing is needed. In addition to the City’s existing Housing and Homelessness Strategy, the City can build on existing municipal incentives to encourage new housing while ensuring there is enough available land to produce more affordable housing options. If the LRT does not get built, the surplus of Metrolinx properties on the former LRT Corridor should be developed into social housing. If the LRT does get built, the community benefits should include more affordable and social housing units.
R101Build on existing municipal incentives to encourage new housing and affordable housing options.
5Community Space / Planning
If the price of commercial and industrial real estate drops, desirable spaces and locations will likely be acquired for residential or commercial development, potentially reducing access to community space and/or housing.

Using zoning tools, municipal loan guarantees, and perhaps even purchasing assets, the City can help community organizations maintain access to real estate (e.g. for community hubs or more affordable housing). Other Canadian communities have created zoning designations for church buildings that ensure they stay in community hands.

In addition, community space must be accessible, barrier-free, and always advance inclusion. Principles of universal design, appropriate funding, and enforcement mechanisms need to be in place to ensure no one is excluded from public space.
The need to include people from equity seeking groups in the decision making process - which is noted in the preamble - may be illustrated by the example of restaurant patios using sidewalks for safe outdoor dining. In this example, people who are blind, have vision loss or require room to maneuver mobility devices find it challenging to navigate hazards if they have to move onto the road. Creative solutions have been found in many jurisdictions but in this case, including people with disabilities in the design would contribute to accessibility for all.
R30A genuinely inclusive, barrier-free planning for people with disabilities and universal design needs to include funding and enforcement to ensure it will be delivered.
6Technology and Connectivity
The pandemic has made technology essential, and businesses, not for profit organizations, individuals, and families require sufficient access to participate in the economy and recovery. However, many do not have the means to purchase technology and lack of bandwidth or WIFI has also presented a barrier.

New opportunities include more public space WIFI (e.g. libraries, career centres, parks), collective purchasing of technology to reduce cost, and building on existing community supports and municipal initiatives to ensure now-essential technology is accessible.
Additional digital literacy supports are also needed to enable residents to participate in virtual communication, services, programs, education, and employment.
R9Build on the City's Intelligent Community Plan
7Mental Health
The pandemic has exacerbated mental health and addictions. To ensure those affected have opportunities to participate in the economic recovery, it will be important to educate and build the capacity of employers to understand and meet the needs of their workforce to enhance the provision of mental health supports to better protect and support employees. Advocating to other levels of government for additional investment for mental health and addiction services is also a priority.
R91Partnerships Collaborations (Health and Wellbeing)
- Lobby Province to allocate funding for recovery of healthcare, substance abuse,mental health and other key areas.
8Food Security and Resilience
Food insecurity has increased during COVID-19 and the need will continue through the recovery. It will be important to move forward with Hamilton’s food strategy to support low income families. The City should also invest in expanded infrastructure to ensure local food production is enhanced. Food workers often have precarious status and deserve wage security, safe conditions and a pathway to immigration. It is important to promote and advocate for this given Hamilton’s contributions as a food producing area.
R38Continue to move forward on Hamilton’s food strategy to support local food security for low income families.
9Workforce Training and Employment
Increased investments in skill development, skilled trades, micro training, micro-credentialing, employment supports, employment readiness, education, retraining, placements, and employer incentives are policy and funding tools to support job seekers. In particular, job seekers with barriers and/or the already-marginalized groups who risk being left further behind.
R25Increase investments in skill development, skilled trades, micro training, micro credentialing, employment supports, employment readiness, education, retraining, placements, and employer incentives are policy and funding tools to support job seekers (including those with barriers and/or the already-marginalized groups who risk being left further behind) and the employment that will be key to economic recovery.
10Social Procurement
Ensure the City leads with social and local procurement. Hamilton already has a Social Procurement program in place that could be an important part of the recovery for the NFP/social service sector, job seekers and business owners from marginalized communities.
R11Ensure the City leads with social and local procurement.
11Supporting local business owners
Offer targeted support to business owners from disproportionately impacted groups—not only women but also racialized people, persons with disabilities, Indigenous people, and immigrants—in the form of emergency funding. This funding would include skills training, mentorship and marketing to allow for businesses to pivot and come out of the pandemic thriving.
R25Increase investments in skill development, skilled trades, micro training, micro credentialing, employment supports, employment readiness, education, retraining, placements, and employer incentives are policy and funding tools to support job seekers (including those with barriers and/or the already-marginalized groups who risk being left further behind) and the employment that will be key to economic recovery.
12Sustainable Funding, Capacity & Resources for equity-serving organizations
Government funding should never create barriers and must advance equity based outcomes throughout our city.

The City must examine the administration of all funding streams to ensure the investments are aimed to achieve outcomes that redress systemic forms of inequity.

Dedicated funding must be sustainable for individuals and community organizations to meet the increased need of equity-seeking individuals and groups to ensure their capacity to deliver support through each phase of recovery
R45The City Enrichment Fund undergoing an Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) Review.
13Income Security
Wage inequality has continued to widen through the pandemic. To ensure an inclusive recovery, Hamilton employers should pay all employees a living wage or set a short timeline by which to bring all employees to a living wage. Recognizing that current income supports are not adequate, ensure the City advocates for a Universal Basic Income.
R23Ensure the direct connection is made to the health and wellbeing of the community AND the economy. When people with disabilities, from racialized communities, those living below the poverty line, women, newcomers, youth, etc. have employment, employers and the overall economy benefit.

Labour

ActionPriority Areas of ActionLinked ToRecommendationStatus
1We recommend that all employers in Hamilton pay all employees a living wage or set a short timeline by which to bring all employees to a living wage.R93Hamilton Fair Wage Policy reflects local ICI prevailing wage
2We recommend that all employers (who contract jobs or services) adopt procedures whereby living wage requirements are written into procurement and tendering policies.R55Create “minimum wage” pay scale for musicians hired by the City and at city-related/sanctioned events, to ensure musicians are paid fairly as reopening happens and afterwards
3We recommend that all employers in Hamilton, who have not already undertaken pay equity assessments to do so by contacting the Ontario Pay Equity Commission for Gender Equity and in consultation with the standard set by the Canadian Human Rights Commission for those whose gender is intersectional with race, LGBTQ2SI+, and/or disability.New Recommendation / Action
4We recommend that the Task Force communicate support of publicly run, single-payer, universal pharmacare and dental care plans to federal and provincial levels of government.New Recommendation / Action
5We recommend that all employers strictly adhere to article 25(2)(h) of the Occupational
Health and Safety Act which dictates that an employer shall “take every precaution
reasonable in the circumstances for the protection of a worker”.
R80Occupational Health and Safety supports for small business and not-for-profit
6We recommend that all employers strictly adhere to Article 50.1 which prohibits reprisals against any worker who is acting or reporting in compliance with the Occupational Health and Safety Act.New Recommendation / Action
7We recommend all employers adopt policies, practices and procedures that clearly ensure effective and impartial mechanisms are in place to ensure investigation of complaints, providing support and protection for survivors of gender-based violence, and holding perpetrators accountable.New Recommendation / Action
8We recommend the City of Hamilton should connect any existing targets for greenhouse gas emissions to future infrastructure development in renewable energies, home and building retrofits, public transit, and just transition measures supporting workers and their families.R40Establish a firm urban boundary to protect agricultural lands, natural resources, and prevent sprawl that drastically increases greenhouse gas emissions and infrastructure costs. Hamilton’s best opportunity to meet
9We recommend that the City of Hamilton and other large employers in the city help to ensure all of the above decent work practices across Hamilton by requiring attestations of compliance to the aforementioned recommendations from all businesses who are part of tendering or procurement for goods or services.New Recommendation / Action